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Museum of Modern Art Vacation


Rates from:  $298.00  per person for 2-night complete package


Your Museum of Modern Art Vacation in New York City Includes:

  • Accommodations for 2-nights or longer in a midtown Manhattan hotel of your choice, in the heart of Times Square, the Theater District, Rockefeller Center and just a short stroll from the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA NYC).
  • Admission to the Museum of Modern Art
  • And much more

What is in the The MoMA Collection?

The Starry Night, Vincent van Gogh at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)One of the world's greatest art museums, and certainly one of the best museums in NYC, the Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to being the foremost museum of modern art in the world. From an initial gift of eight prints and one drawing, The Museum of Modern Art's collection has grown to include 150,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, architectural models and drawings, and design objects.

Painting and Sculpture at the MoMA - The world's largest and most inclusive collection of modern painting and sculpture comprises some 3,200 works dating from the late nineteenth century to the present. It provides a comprehensive selection of the major artists and movements since the 1890s, from Paul Cézanne's The Bather and Vincent van Gogh's The Starry Night to masterworks of today.

Drawings - One of the most comprehensive collections of twentieth-century drawings anywhere, MoMA's holdings bring together more than 6,000 works on paper. These include a historical range of drawings in pencil, ink, and charcoal, as well as watercolors, gouaches, collages, and works in mixed mediums.

New York City Museums and Attractions: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)Prints and Illustrated Books - Individual artists as well as art movements are found in both range and depth. Techniques represented range from traditional woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and screenprints to newer processes such as digital printmaking. Among the unique strengths of the collection is the inclusion of numerous states of many important prints, demonstrating the artists' creative processes.

Photography - The Museum of Modern Art's holdings of more than 25,000 works dating from approximately 1840 to the present constitute one of the most important collections of photography in the world.

Film and Media - An international collection of some 20,000 moving-image works incorporates all periods and genres in more than a century of film and media. Daily programs of works are shown in the Museum's two movie theaters (there may be an additional charge for screenings).

Architecture and Design - Starting with the reform ideology established by the Arts and Crafts movement, the collection covers major movements of the twentieth century and contemporary issues. The architecture collection documents buildings through models, drawings, and photographs, and includes the Mies van der Rohe Archive. The design collection comprises more than 3,000 objects, ranging from appliances, furniture, and tableware to tools, textiles, sports cars—even a helicopter. 

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What Are Current Exhibits at the The MoMA NYC?

MoMA - Bouchra KhaliliBouchra Khalili: The Mapping Journey Project
Date: Through August 28, 2016
This exhibition presents, in its entirety, Bouchra Khalili’s The Mapping Journey Project (2008–11), a series of videos that details the stories of eight individuals who have been forced by political and economic circumstances to travel illegally and whose covert journeys have taken them throughout the Mediterranean basin. Khalili (Moroccan-French, born 1975) encountered her subjects by chance in transit hubs across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. Following an initial meeting, the artist invited each person to narrate his or her journey and trace it in thick permanent marker on a geopolitical map of the region. The videos feature the subjects’ voices and their hands sketching their trajectories across the map, while their faces remain unseen.
The stories are presented on individual screens positioned throughout MoMA's Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium. In this way, a complex network of migration is narrated by those who have experienced it, refusing the forms of representation and visibility demanded by systems of surveillance, international border control, and the news media. Shown together, the videos function as an alternative geopolitical map defined by the precarious lives of stateless people. Khalili’s work takes on the challenge of developing critical and ethical approaches to questions of citizenship, community, and political agency.

MoMA Art Lab: Process
Date: Through August 31, 2016
What inspires artists? What inspires you? Discover different ways of making art and engage in your own creative process in our newest lab. 

MoMA - Rachel HarrisonRachel Harrison: Perth Amboy
Date: Through September 5, 2016
Named after a town in New Jersey where an apparition of the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared on the window of a two-story house, Rachel Harrison’s room-sized work Perth Amboy exemplifies a cross-disciplinary approach to making art. The work comprises 21 photographs, individual sculptural assemblages, and an open-ended labyrinth made from cardboard. It takes as its subject the basic acts of looking and seeing, which are central to any experience of visual art. This is the first presentation of Perth Amboy at MoMA since the work entered the collection in 2011.


MoMA: Dadaglobe ReconstructedDadaglobe Reconstructed
Date: Through September 18, 2016
Dadaglobe Reconstructed reunites over 100 works created for Dadaglobe, Tristan Tzara’s planned but unrealized magnum opus, originally slated for publication in 1921. An ambitious anthology that aimed to document Dada’s international activities, Dadaglobe was not merely a vehicle for existing works, but served as a catalyst for the production of new ones. Tzara invited some 50 artists from 10 countries to submit artworks in four categories: photographic self-portraits, photographs of artworks, original drawings, and layouts for book pages. The exhibition brings together these photographs, drawings, photomontages, and collages, along with a selection of related archival material, to reconstruct this volume. Though never published, due to financial and organizational difficulties, Tzara’s project addresses concerns about art’s reproducibility that continue to be relevant today.

Museum of Modern Art: Bruce Conner, It's All TrueBRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE
Date: Through October 2, 2016
BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE is the artist’s first monographic museum exhibition in New York, the first large survey of his work in 16 years, and the first complete retrospective of his 50-year career. It brings together over 250 objects, from film and video to painting, assemblage, drawing, prints, photography, photograms, and performance.
Bruce Conner (1933–2008) was one of the foremost American artists of the postwar era. Emerging from the California art scene, in which he worked for half a century, Conner’s work touches on various themes of postwar American society, from a rising consumer culture to the dread of nuclear apocalypse. Working simultaneously in a range of mediums, Conner created hybrids of painting and sculpture, film and performance, drawing and printing, including bodies of works on paper utilizing drawing and collage and two important photographic bodies of work, including a haunting group of black-and-white life-sized photograms called ANGELS. An early practitioner of found-object assemblage, his relief and free-standing sculptural objects, such as CHILD (1959) and LOOKING GLASS (1964), were widely recognized for their masterful compositions and daringly dark subject matter.
Equally a pioneer of avant-garde filmmaking, Conner developed a quick-cut method of editing that defined his oeuvre. Incorporating footage from a variety of sources—countdown leaders, training films, and newsreels—and adding later his own 16mm film footage, Conner’s films also focus on disturbing but utterly current themes. For their structural innovation and daring subject matter, films like A MOVIE (1958) and CROSSROADS (1976) have become landmarks of American experimental cinema.


MoMA: Yayoi KusamaFrom the Collection: 1960–1969
Date: Through Sunday, March 12, 2017
The Museum of Modern Art has reinstalled its fourth-floor collection galleries with works exclusively from the 1960s. Interweaving works from all of MoMA’s curatorial departments and the Museum Archives, this presentation focuses on a decade in which interdisciplinary artistic experimentation flourished, traditional mediums were transformed, and sociopolitical upheaval occurred across the globe. The galleries proceed chronologically, with work installed by year. This organizing principle steps back from the classification of galleries by art historical themes or “isms” and instead aims to provide a variety of fresh discoveries and unexpected connections. The product of a collaborative effort among curators from all departments, the presentation will undergo periodic reinstallations, reflecting the depth and richness of the Museum’s collection and the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art, architecture, design, and the moving image.


New York City Museums and Attractions: Museum of Modern Art -MoMAFigure in the Garden
Date: Ongoing
This summer’s Sculpture Garden installation brings together figurative works from the late 19th century to the present day. Making its debut in the Sculpture Garden is Figurengruppe/Group of Figures, by contemporary German artist Katharina Fritsch (b. 1956). Conceived in 2006–08, the work features nine life-size sculptures of, among other figures, St. Michael, a Madonna, a giant, and a snake, all rendered in precise detail and finished in bold colors. Religious symbolism and references to mythology abound, yet any fixed meaning remains open and elusive. Group of Figures is joined by earlier works such as Auguste Rodin’s heroic St. John the Baptist Preaching (1878–80) and Aristide Maillol’s pensive Mediterranean (1902–05). Striking a casual pose in his derby hat is Elie Nadelman’s Man in the Open Air (c. 1915), and perched atop a tall pedestal is Gaston Lachaise’s open-armed, voluptuous Floating Figure (1927). Perennial favorites like Picasso’s She-Goat (1950) and Miró’s Moonbird (1966) are on view as well, in addition to works by Renée Sintenis, Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, Henry Moore, and Tom Otterness.

Museum of Modern Art: Gustav Klimt's Adele Bloch-Bauer IIGustav Klimt’s Adele Bloch-Bauer II
Date: Ongoing
One of two formal portraits that Gustav Klimt made of Adele Bloch-Bauer, an important patron of the artist, is now on view at MoMA as a special long-term loan from a private collection. Adele Bloch-Bauer was the wife of Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, a wealthy industrialist in Vienna, where Klimt lived and worked. Completed in 1912, the composition emphasizes Bloch-Bauer’s social station within Vienna’s cultural elite. Her towering figure, in opulent dress, is set against a jewel-toned backdrop of nearly abstract patterned blocks that suggest a richly decorated domestic interior. In 1938, the Nazis took possession of this portrait along with other works of art in the Bloch-Bauer family’s collection (including Adele Bloch-Bauer I, now in the collection of the Neue Galerie, New York). In 2006, after years of legal negotiations, the works were returned to the Bloch-Bauer heirs and subsequently sold to other collections. Adele Bloch-Bauer II is joined by a selection of works from the Museum’s collection, including paintings, drawings, and objects by Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka, Josef Hoffmann, Koloman Moser, and others.


Museum of Modern Art: Design and ViolenceDesign and Violence
Date: Ongoing
Design and Violence is an experimental online curatorial project that will stretch over several months, maybe years. Its purpose is to explore the idea of violence in contemporary society using design objects as prompts for wider questions and reflections. Violence, at least at the beginning of the project, is defined as the manifestation of the power to alter circumstances, against the will of others and to their detriment.
Design has a history of violence. It can be an act of creative destruction and a double-edged sword, surprising us with consequences intended or unintended. Although designers aim to work toward the betterment of society, it is and has been easy for them to overstep, indulge in temptation, succumb to the dark side of a moral dilemma, or simply err.

New York City Museums and Attractions: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) - Pablo Picasso les Demoiselles d'AvignonPainting & Sculpture I
Date: Ongoing
The works displayed on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. The Painting and Sculpture Galleries on the fourth floor display art made between 1940 and 1980; the Contemporary Galleries, on the second floor, present the most recent works in the collection.

New York City Museums and Attractions: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA); Jackson PollockPainting & Sculpture II
Ongoing
Learn more about the department of Painting & Sculpture
The works displayed on the fourth floor roughly span the years 1940 to 1980. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, Minimalism, Conceptual art, and the work of Marcel Broodthaers, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. The Painting and Sculpture Galleries on the fifth floor display art made between 1880 and 1940; the Contemporary Galleries, on the second floor, present the most recent works in the collection.

What Are Upcoming Exhibitions at The MoMA?

Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers
Date: July 30, 2016–April 23, 2017
Lovers is an immersive, room-sized multimedia installation by Japanese artist Teiji Furuhashi (1960–1995). Life-sized images of the artist and other fellow members of the Kyoto-based artist collective Dumb Type are projected onto the walls of a darkened room from a tower of computer-controlled video and slide projectors at its center. The figures move like specters around the perimeter of the space, in a looped choreographic sequence made variable by a visitor-activated motion sensor, which intervenes to restart one of the projections when triggered. Confined to their autonomous projections, these eponymous “lovers” overlap at moments within the sequence, whether running past each other or pausing in a gesture of embrace, yet their bodies never make contact. Made just one year before Furuhashi’s death from AIDS-related illness, Lovers speaks to what the artist has described as “the theme of contemporary love in an ultra-romantic way.” Presented for the first time since its inaugural exhibition at MoMA in 1995, the installation showcases the results of an extensive conservation effort recently completed by the Museum’s media conservators.

Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts
Date: September 18, 2016–January 22, 2017
Kai Althoff (b. 1966, Germany) is one of the most significant artists of his generation, which came to maturity at the turn of the 21st century. This exhibition features works from all periods of his career, including painting, drawing, collage, sculptural objects, photography, and sound. Drawn from public and private collections worldwide, the selection of works for this show was made by Althoff himself, and will be displayed in the form of an immersive environment designed by the artist. The exhibition is accompanied by an artist’s book, also designed by Althoff.
Kai Althoff has written his own description of the exhibition.
Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter
Date: October 1, 2016–January 22, 2017
For over 60 million persons in the world today, shelter is defined through constant movement or escape. Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter explores the ways in which contemporary architecture and design have addressed notions of shelter in light of global refugee emergencies. From the strengthening of international borders to the logistics of mobile housing systems, how we understand shelter is ultimately defined through an engagement with security. Refugee camps, once considered temporary settlements, have become sites through which to examine how human rights intersect with the making of cities. Bringing together projects by architects, designers, and artists, working in a range of mediums and scales, that respond to the complex circumstances brought about by forced displacement, the exhibition focuses on conditions that disrupt conventional images of the built environment.
How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior
Date: October 1, 2016–April 23, 2017
How Should We Live? explores the complex collaborations, materials, and processes that have shaped the modernist interior, with a focus on specific environments—domestic interiors, re-created exhibition displays, and retail spaces—from the 1920s to the 1950s. The exhibition brings together over 200 works, drawn from MoMA's Architecture and Design collection as well as the Library, Drawings and Prints, Painting and Sculpture, Film, and Photography. Rather than concentrating on isolated masterworks, attention is given to the synthesis of design elements within each environment, and to the connection of external factors and attitudes—aesthetic, social, technological, and political—that these environments reflect.
The exhibition looks at several designers’ own living spaces, and at frequently neglected areas in the field of design, including textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. Highlights include recent acquisitions from projects directed by major women architect-designers—Eileen Gray furnishings for the house E-1027 (1929), and Charlotte Perriand’s study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil (1959), for example. Designs from other noted partnerships include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe’s Velvet and Silk Café (1927), Grete Lihotzky’s Frankfurt Kitchen (1926–27), and collaborations between Aino and Alvar Aalto, Ray and Charles Eames, Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter, and Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret and Le Corbusier.

MoMA: Anne Teresa De KeersmaekerAnne Teresa De Keersmaeker: Work/Travail/Arbeid
Date: March 25–April 2, 2017
The starting point for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid is a simple question: Can choreography be performed in the form of an exhibition? To answer that question, she reinterpreted her dance performance Vortex Temporum (2013), which was originally performed in a theater, for the radically different temporal and physical circumstances of a museum; the original length of the work was expanded into cycles of nine hours, and it was adapted to the specific characteristics of the space. The original version of the exhibition, at the WIELS centre for contemporary art, Brussels, lasted nine weeks in 2015. An abridged travel version of the exhibition will be re-choreographed and re-created for the unique space of MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium for nine consecutive days.

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW
Date: April 30–July 30, 2017
WHY PICTURES NOW, the first New York museum survey of the work of American artist Louise Lawler, is an exploration of her creative output, which has inspired fellow artists and cultural thinkers alike for the past four decades. The exhibition consists of a sequence of mural-scale, “adjusted to fit” images set in dynamic relation to non-linear groupings of photographs—of collectors’ homes, auction houses, and museum installations—distinctive of Lawler’s conceptual exercises. Additionally, a deceptively empty space presents black-and-white tracings of Lawler’s photographs that have been printed on vinyl and mounted directly to the wall. A display of the artist’s ephemera from the 1970s to today highlights the feminist and performative undercurrents of her art. The defiant, utterly quizzical sound piece Birdcalls (1972/81), for which the artist turned the names of well-known male artists into bird-like squawks and twitters, will be installed in the Museum’s Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden. In foregrounding her work’s relationship to the economies of collaboration and exchange, Lawler shifts focus from the individual picture to the broader history of art. Her careful attention to artistic contexts, modes of presentation, and viewers’ receptions generates witty, affective situations that contribute to institutional transformation.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive
Date: June 12–October 1, 2017
Frank Lloyd Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, MoMA presents Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive, a major exhibition that critically engages his multifaceted practice. The exhibition comprises approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archive, interpreting and contextualizing it, and juxtaposing it with other works from the Archive, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

MoMA: Items: Is Fashion Modern?Items: Is Fashion Modern?
Date: December 10, 2017–April 1, 2018
Items: Is Fashion Modern? explores the present, past, and future of 99 items—garments, accessories, and accoutrements—that have had a strong impact on history and society in the 20th and 21st centuries, and continue to hold currency today. Among the 99 will be designs as well-known and transformative as the Levi’s 501s, the Casio watch, and the Little Black Dress, and as ancient and culturally charged as the kippah and the keffiyeh. Each item will be displayed in the incarnation that made it significant in the last 116 years—the stereotype—along with contextual materials that trace back to its historical archetype. In some cases, the item will also be complemented by a new commission—a prototype. Items will thus invite new generations of designers, engineers, and manufacturers to respond to some of these “indispensable items” with pioneering materials, approaches, and techniques—extending this conversation into the near and distant futures, and connecting the history of these garments with their present recombination and use. Driven first and foremost by objects, not designers, the exhibition considers the many relationships between fashion and functionality, cultural etiquettes, aesthetics, politics, labor, identities, economies, and technology.

MoMA Video:

Watch a video clip of Museum of Modern Art  (MoMA)

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New York City Museums and Attractions: Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)Where is the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Located?
The Museum of Modern Art is located at 11 West 53rd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues

What are the MoMA's Hours of Operation?
MoMA is open Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday 10:30am-5:30pm
Friday 10:30am-8pm
Closed Tuesdays, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day


How do I get to MoMA?

Directions to MoMA by Subway:
  • E, V to Fifth Avenue/53 Street
  • B, D, F to 47-50 Streets/Rockefeller Center
Directions to MoMA by Bus:
  • M1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 53 Street
NOTE: Rates listed are per person based on two adults sharing a room for 2 nights, subject to availability and change. Rates include all taxes and service fees, and all listed features. Triple, quad, single and child rates are available. Starting price is based upon lowest-priced off-peak 3-Star hotel unless otherwise specified. You may get prices on other hotel and date options, longer stays, additional theater, sightseeing and dining, and transportation to NYC on NYC TripQuote.
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